Storm Phobias

By Paula McArthur on 19 July, 2016 in Information
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Summer storms can cause our pets anxiety too.

Summer Hiding Dogstorms are common when we have such mixed weather as we are experiencing currently.  Our pets can become distressed during thunder storms in the same way they might on Bonfire Night.

Remember that your pet will probably know a storm is coming because they can feel changes in barometric pressure or even when they see the dark clouds coming.  This may lead to fear responses before the storm arrives, such as whining, hiding, urinating or trembling.  Watching for these early signs will help you prepare to weather the storm together.

Our instinct as pet owners is to comfort our pets if they are nervous or distressed and our need to provide reassurance can sometimes backfire.  Dogs in particular normally see cuddles and strokes as a reward for something they did, so if you cuddle your dog when he is afraid of loud noises you can inadvertently reinforce his behavior and therefore make his fears worse for the future.

 

There are some other things you can do, which can help your pet be less frightened of the freaky weather without reinforcing their fears.

  • Ensure your pet is indoors when the storms are likely to occur.
  • Don’t walk your dog during a storm if possible.
  • Make sure that your pet has somewhere to hide if they wish – (maybe a cupboard under the stairs/under the bed – where it is quiet and comfortable).
  • Don’t make a fuss of your pet if they show signs of fear (unless they are going to hurt themselves.
  • Be calm yourself – pets pick up on how you react so it you are frightened they will notice.
  • During a storm, close windows and doors to help muffle the noises and draw the curtains to keep out the flashing from lightening.
  • Calming music such as classical can help to block out the noises, but make sure there are no loud bangs and crashes on the tracks you choose!
  • If your pet has a buddy who is not afraid, try to keep them together as the calming influence may help.
  • Ensure that your pet is safe and secure and cannot escape if there is a sudden noise.
  • Make sure they are microchipped in case they do escape – they can be more quickly re-united with you if they can be identified.
  • Remember smaller pets too, especially those living outside. Bring hutches indoors if possible or part-cover them to help muffle the thunder and lightning.

 

 

About the Author

Paula McArthurView all posts by Paula McArthur

1 Comment

  1. R Jobling 22 March, 2017 Reply

    Good advice – thanks

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